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Thursday, 27 January 2011

Where is he now?


On the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz, I find myself wondering whatever happened to this little boy after he walked free from the childrens' barracks amid the cold and the carnage. 

And I feel grateful that I am able to raise my little ones without fear of this happening to them, and grateful to all those who died to make our peaceful life possible. But I feel sad and angry that our very own governments have used this peace to inflict similar brutality on children in other parts of the world. Will it ever stop?


Image: US Holocaust Memorial Museum.

5 comments:

Ann Nichols said...

Very very poignant...
I was just looking at some pictures from the destruction of Smyrna the other day and wondering about some school girls who were all dressed in white... a picture that was taken just days before the pillage and carnage occurred that September of '22...
So many unnamed people throughout history to whom we must be grateful...
Beautiful post...
Blessings to you and your dear family,
Ann
PS What a beautiful little boy in this photo...I too wonder, did he grow to manhood, is he still alive...

Caution Flag said...

I never think of the children of when I think of that nightmare. So many of the images are of the adults. I will hug my children just a little longer today when they come home.

chrysalis said...

What a lovely face - reminiscent of another little boy I know! The little boy in the picture would be in his sixties now - let us hope he survived to have a good life.

Karin said...

Really touching my heart strings with your post. I was born end of '44 and these beautiful children look 8-10 years old! When I see photos like that I do wonder about their life story of the rest of their life.

At the nursing home where I work we had a Jewish woman who survived one of the camps. She passed away probably a decade ago but her hubby is still with us. Amazing love that God placed in our hearts for one another - she Jewish and me German!

Love your thankful thoughts!

Louise | Italy said...

Karin: My first husband's father was a child-survivor of Auschwitz. My husband now is German - his grandfather spent 12 years in a Soviet work camp. There is horror on all sides. And thankfully, compassion on all sides too.

Thursday, 27 January 2011

Where is he now?


On the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz, I find myself wondering whatever happened to this little boy after he walked free from the childrens' barracks amid the cold and the carnage. 

And I feel grateful that I am able to raise my little ones without fear of this happening to them, and grateful to all those who died to make our peaceful life possible. But I feel sad and angry that our very own governments have used this peace to inflict similar brutality on children in other parts of the world. Will it ever stop?


Image: US Holocaust Memorial Museum.

5 comments:

Ann Nichols said...

Very very poignant...
I was just looking at some pictures from the destruction of Smyrna the other day and wondering about some school girls who were all dressed in white... a picture that was taken just days before the pillage and carnage occurred that September of '22...
So many unnamed people throughout history to whom we must be grateful...
Beautiful post...
Blessings to you and your dear family,
Ann
PS What a beautiful little boy in this photo...I too wonder, did he grow to manhood, is he still alive...

Caution Flag said...

I never think of the children of when I think of that nightmare. So many of the images are of the adults. I will hug my children just a little longer today when they come home.

chrysalis said...

What a lovely face - reminiscent of another little boy I know! The little boy in the picture would be in his sixties now - let us hope he survived to have a good life.

Karin said...

Really touching my heart strings with your post. I was born end of '44 and these beautiful children look 8-10 years old! When I see photos like that I do wonder about their life story of the rest of their life.

At the nursing home where I work we had a Jewish woman who survived one of the camps. She passed away probably a decade ago but her hubby is still with us. Amazing love that God placed in our hearts for one another - she Jewish and me German!

Love your thankful thoughts!

Louise | Italy said...

Karin: My first husband's father was a child-survivor of Auschwitz. My husband now is German - his grandfather spent 12 years in a Soviet work camp. There is horror on all sides. And thankfully, compassion on all sides too.