Copyright © Louise Bostock 2007-2013. Please give credit where credit is due.

Wednesday, 17 March 2010

Rainbow flag

Seven degrees at 8:30am, and warm in the sun.

When I first came as a full-time card-carrying resident to Carmine Superiore, the war in Iraq was just beginning. The airwaves were loaded, indeed, overloaded, with claim and counter-claim, Bush and Saddam, WMD real and imaginary.

One of the most potent images in those days was the rainbow flag bearing the word pace, peace. As I travelled to and fro from Carmine to Milan, from Milan to London and back again, I saw dozens of them - colourful, hopeful - draped from buildings ancient and modern, grand and humble. And every time I returned to my new home, I was greeted by Carmine's own contribution to the rainbow protest, hanging from a disused building right on the lake.

As the invasion went ahead and the killing began, the flags continued to flutter in the wind, steadfastly proclaiming a peace that could still be. When Baghdad was taken and Saddam finally executed, most of the flags gradually vanished. Carmine's, though, remained, and as month followed month, year followed year, people continued to die on both sides, and Carmine's flag and the building it flew from became ever more ragged.

Today, this is what you see when you arrive in Carmine Inferiore...


After seven years, Iraq, the cradle of civilisation, lies in tatters, just like Carmine's rainbow flag, and the sadly derelict building it adorns.


For more Window Views from around the world, click here.

14 comments:

Brandon said...

I remember the flags. This is a very good post.

Louise | Italy said...

Thanks, Brandon. Knowing your 'special interest' I appreciate your comment.

LadyFi said...

Such a moving and sad post. And a beautiful photo of forgotten hopes.

Oh mamma said...

I find those lonely, fainted flags, very sad too. Forgotten ghosts of a forgotten war. Or maybe unshakable faith in peace.

ewok1993 said...

the window has lots of stories to tell.

Lew said...

Sad windows for a sad situation! Hopefully the elections will result in a more stable Iraq and the killing will end!

Woodman said...

Yes we all despise war but in the olden days Kings etc lead their soldiers into battle. How about Brown, Blair and Bush doing the same. Maybe then they would think again if their worthless necks were in harms way.

Greyscale Territory said...

A most informative post! The story is so sad! We hear so much about troubled Iraq on the news, but it is seldom we hear stories like this that really touch the heart! Beautiful!

Stine in Ontario said...

Thought-provoking post, Louise. If only those in power had THOUGHT deeply before they acted in the first place.

Carol said...

That's a very powerful image!! *sigh* makes me really sad...

C x

Marina said...

beautiful photo.

Warren Baldwin said...

Sadly poetic. And true. I wonder if the ragged flag and building are indicative of the ragged excuses given us by the leaders?

Karin said...

Worthy of note photo! When I see photos like this I always wonder as to its story. Thanks for sharing this moving story.

Kel said...

Happy Friday!

Kel
http://betweenthelines-kam.blogspot.com

Wednesday, 17 March 2010

Rainbow flag

Seven degrees at 8:30am, and warm in the sun.

When I first came as a full-time card-carrying resident to Carmine Superiore, the war in Iraq was just beginning. The airwaves were loaded, indeed, overloaded, with claim and counter-claim, Bush and Saddam, WMD real and imaginary.

One of the most potent images in those days was the rainbow flag bearing the word pace, peace. As I travelled to and fro from Carmine to Milan, from Milan to London and back again, I saw dozens of them - colourful, hopeful - draped from buildings ancient and modern, grand and humble. And every time I returned to my new home, I was greeted by Carmine's own contribution to the rainbow protest, hanging from a disused building right on the lake.

As the invasion went ahead and the killing began, the flags continued to flutter in the wind, steadfastly proclaiming a peace that could still be. When Baghdad was taken and Saddam finally executed, most of the flags gradually vanished. Carmine's, though, remained, and as month followed month, year followed year, people continued to die on both sides, and Carmine's flag and the building it flew from became ever more ragged.

Today, this is what you see when you arrive in Carmine Inferiore...


After seven years, Iraq, the cradle of civilisation, lies in tatters, just like Carmine's rainbow flag, and the sadly derelict building it adorns.


For more Window Views from around the world, click here.

14 comments:

Brandon said...

I remember the flags. This is a very good post.

Louise | Italy said...

Thanks, Brandon. Knowing your 'special interest' I appreciate your comment.

LadyFi said...

Such a moving and sad post. And a beautiful photo of forgotten hopes.

Oh mamma said...

I find those lonely, fainted flags, very sad too. Forgotten ghosts of a forgotten war. Or maybe unshakable faith in peace.

ewok1993 said...

the window has lots of stories to tell.

Lew said...

Sad windows for a sad situation! Hopefully the elections will result in a more stable Iraq and the killing will end!

Woodman said...

Yes we all despise war but in the olden days Kings etc lead their soldiers into battle. How about Brown, Blair and Bush doing the same. Maybe then they would think again if their worthless necks were in harms way.

Greyscale Territory said...

A most informative post! The story is so sad! We hear so much about troubled Iraq on the news, but it is seldom we hear stories like this that really touch the heart! Beautiful!

Stine in Ontario said...

Thought-provoking post, Louise. If only those in power had THOUGHT deeply before they acted in the first place.

Carol said...

That's a very powerful image!! *sigh* makes me really sad...

C x

Marina said...

beautiful photo.

Warren Baldwin said...

Sadly poetic. And true. I wonder if the ragged flag and building are indicative of the ragged excuses given us by the leaders?

Karin said...

Worthy of note photo! When I see photos like this I always wonder as to its story. Thanks for sharing this moving story.

Kel said...

Happy Friday!

Kel
http://betweenthelines-kam.blogspot.com