Copyright © Louise Bostock 2007-2013. Please give credit where credit is due.

Sunday, 21 June 2009

Summer solstice garden update

Hot, but with a cooling wind, and the occasional cloud to make the Sunday picnickers feel chilly enough to appreciate the warmth when the sun came out again.

On this solstice day we ate our first apricots and our first cucumber. The raspberries seem as if they may finally be over after about three weeks of fruiting valiantly under sustained assaults by the children (thank-you to Ila for giving us our first canes, two years ago). The blueberries are also fruiting.

The zucchine are not, this year, Defender F1, but still we've started our annual zucchine-with-everything season, and it looks like we'll have to endure the same dietary regime for some weeks to come.

The lavender is still in full flower and giving what seems like an entire hive of bees something to dance about. The tomatoes are doing well, and the chilli peppers are laden with beautiful long, shiny peppers - still green as yet.

What else? The roses and the strawberries are showing signs of coming into a second flower, and the pear trees, the vines, and the leeks are looking good for later in the year. The hydrangeas are good and showy, as ever, and the gladioli and the day lilies are at most a week away.

For the first time in seven years, when we started the long process of turning our little patch of campo into some sort of garden (no Ground Force 48-hour deadlines, heavy diggers, enormous budgets or gardening experts here), I looked around me this midsummer's day and found I liked quite a lot of what I saw.

And my back's killing me.

1 comment:

ladyfi said...

Sounds delicious and delightful.. the garden, nt the painful back!

Sunday, 21 June 2009

Summer solstice garden update

Hot, but with a cooling wind, and the occasional cloud to make the Sunday picnickers feel chilly enough to appreciate the warmth when the sun came out again.

On this solstice day we ate our first apricots and our first cucumber. The raspberries seem as if they may finally be over after about three weeks of fruiting valiantly under sustained assaults by the children (thank-you to Ila for giving us our first canes, two years ago). The blueberries are also fruiting.

The zucchine are not, this year, Defender F1, but still we've started our annual zucchine-with-everything season, and it looks like we'll have to endure the same dietary regime for some weeks to come.

The lavender is still in full flower and giving what seems like an entire hive of bees something to dance about. The tomatoes are doing well, and the chilli peppers are laden with beautiful long, shiny peppers - still green as yet.

What else? The roses and the strawberries are showing signs of coming into a second flower, and the pear trees, the vines, and the leeks are looking good for later in the year. The hydrangeas are good and showy, as ever, and the gladioli and the day lilies are at most a week away.

For the first time in seven years, when we started the long process of turning our little patch of campo into some sort of garden (no Ground Force 48-hour deadlines, heavy diggers, enormous budgets or gardening experts here), I looked around me this midsummer's day and found I liked quite a lot of what I saw.

And my back's killing me.

1 comment:

ladyfi said...

Sounds delicious and delightful.. the garden, nt the painful back!