Copyright © Louise Bostock 2007-2013. Please give credit where credit is due.

Sunday, 29 March 2009

Wind over Water

The weather in the streets of Carmine is damp and gloomy. The time has sprung forward an hour and we're all slightly discombobulated.

Took delivery yesterday of our newest piece of art, Tammy Vitale's 'Wind over Water'. Very excited, especially as we had started to believe it had been lost in the post.

Tammy is a largely self-taught American artist based in Maryland. She works in a number of media, making paintings, sculptures, ceramics and jewellery pieces. This is an artist who doesn't have to blow her own trumpet. She is represented in various galleries and boutiques along the East Coast, and has exhibited in dozens of shows both solo and group. Her work has found its way into the grateful hands of clients in the US, Britain, France and Italy.

What for me is extraordinary about Tammy's work is the sheer energy it exudes. Tammy's skill for capturing the vibrancy of life is remarkable. As is her ability to produce new images, new forms, new ideas, new instances of thought-provoking beauty at every turn.

Tammy's online gallery is here. It's well worth browsing through all the categories - there is no end to this artist's versatility, energy and thoughtfulness.

“I believe that, since each person in the world is unique, they should be able to buy art that is unique, too - art that helps them create comfortable and special places where ever they find themselves.” --Tammy Vitale

Tammy, you've certainly made that possible for us. Thank-you




15 comments:

Chairman Bill said...

I'm always slightly perturbed by the human desire to want original works of art (I'm as guilty as the next Philistine). It's as if owning a copy somehow makes the work less valid as something of beauty. Is a Picasso print any less worthy than an original, and if so, then what attribute is lost in the copy?

Louise said...

Oils and acrylics have their own three-dimensional quality that you can't recapture in prints. I like being able to see and touch the brushstrokes. Also, like sculptures, this three-dimensional quality means that oroginals change depending on the angle at which you view them, and this makes them forever fresh.

I'm not a snob about it though (I hope) -- there are plenty of prints and reproductions in this house too.

Vanessa said...

What a beautiful image! Great colours.

Anonymous said...

So colourful. Hope you enjoy having it in your home.

Brenda said...

That is a beautiful painting, I especially like the colors. And its wonderful to hear about it from you

Louise said...

I love the colours too, and the feeling of movement. It seems as if you can see the wind ruffling the heron's feathers, and the heron's legs stirring the water.

Tammy Vitale said...

Louise: so happy it finally arrived! And that you love it. You have written a beautiful post here, which I much appreciate. to Chairman Bill I would note that prints do not capture the energy of the artist like an original. I don't know that it's snobbish - my house is hung with originals, many traded for originals of my own. I love the energy they bring. Prints, like the web, do not capture the real thing. Colors get changed. Everything flattens out. I remember seeing my first original VanGogh, a small maybe 8 x 10 thing, in Chicago 40 years ago, and having my breath taken away. The canvas background oranges made the picture look on fire. You don't get that in the prints. Thanks goodness for museums where I can see his originals!

Joy said...

This painting is so beautiful on the screen. I can only imagine to view the original. How fortunate for you to see it now everyday in your home.
I understand Tammy Vitale's comment. We went to The Dallas Museum of Fine Arts a couple of weekends ago, and I completely agree with her point. There's nothing like the real thing baby.

Joy

KatyB said...

Nice pic.

Chairman Bill said...

I'm still not convinced about the desire to own an original not being something to do with snobbery. You can get copies that are exact replicas of the original, down to the brush strokes, bumps and cracks - yet people still eschew them in favour of originals.

Who, for example, would hang a copy of the Mona Lisa in their house? Everyone agrees it's a masterpiece, yet no-one would deign to have a copy on display. They'd rather have an indifferent original from an unknown artist over a copy of a masterpiece.

It has to be snobbery. I can't explain it otherwise.

ladyfi said...

I love the vibrant colours! Delicious!

Louise said...

@Chairman Bill : The Mona Lisa's become a bit of a cliché - I couldnt imagine ever wanting a copy hanging on my wall. Same with many of the other masterworks - Leonardo, Michaelangelo, Van Gogh, the Impressionists...And I can't explain why I feel this way. Perhaps I've been conditioned to believe that the masterpieces of a bygone age have their place elsewhere - in museums, in books, in churches - and the art that is created today is more suitable for my immediate context...

Chairman Bill said...

But why? You can't deny the old masters were great works of art.

Search your soul for the answer.

Joy said...

I just don't think my black velvet painting of Elvis would be the same in a print.


Joy

GutsyWriter said...

I love Tammy's vibrant colors and thank you for sharing. I couldn't see her gallery when I clicked on it. Will try later.

Sunday, 29 March 2009

Wind over Water

The weather in the streets of Carmine is damp and gloomy. The time has sprung forward an hour and we're all slightly discombobulated.

Took delivery yesterday of our newest piece of art, Tammy Vitale's 'Wind over Water'. Very excited, especially as we had started to believe it had been lost in the post.

Tammy is a largely self-taught American artist based in Maryland. She works in a number of media, making paintings, sculptures, ceramics and jewellery pieces. This is an artist who doesn't have to blow her own trumpet. She is represented in various galleries and boutiques along the East Coast, and has exhibited in dozens of shows both solo and group. Her work has found its way into the grateful hands of clients in the US, Britain, France and Italy.

What for me is extraordinary about Tammy's work is the sheer energy it exudes. Tammy's skill for capturing the vibrancy of life is remarkable. As is her ability to produce new images, new forms, new ideas, new instances of thought-provoking beauty at every turn.

Tammy's online gallery is here. It's well worth browsing through all the categories - there is no end to this artist's versatility, energy and thoughtfulness.

“I believe that, since each person in the world is unique, they should be able to buy art that is unique, too - art that helps them create comfortable and special places where ever they find themselves.” --Tammy Vitale

Tammy, you've certainly made that possible for us. Thank-you




15 comments:

Chairman Bill said...

I'm always slightly perturbed by the human desire to want original works of art (I'm as guilty as the next Philistine). It's as if owning a copy somehow makes the work less valid as something of beauty. Is a Picasso print any less worthy than an original, and if so, then what attribute is lost in the copy?

Louise said...

Oils and acrylics have their own three-dimensional quality that you can't recapture in prints. I like being able to see and touch the brushstrokes. Also, like sculptures, this three-dimensional quality means that oroginals change depending on the angle at which you view them, and this makes them forever fresh.

I'm not a snob about it though (I hope) -- there are plenty of prints and reproductions in this house too.

Vanessa said...

What a beautiful image! Great colours.

Anonymous said...

So colourful. Hope you enjoy having it in your home.

Brenda said...

That is a beautiful painting, I especially like the colors. And its wonderful to hear about it from you

Louise said...

I love the colours too, and the feeling of movement. It seems as if you can see the wind ruffling the heron's feathers, and the heron's legs stirring the water.

Tammy Vitale said...

Louise: so happy it finally arrived! And that you love it. You have written a beautiful post here, which I much appreciate. to Chairman Bill I would note that prints do not capture the energy of the artist like an original. I don't know that it's snobbish - my house is hung with originals, many traded for originals of my own. I love the energy they bring. Prints, like the web, do not capture the real thing. Colors get changed. Everything flattens out. I remember seeing my first original VanGogh, a small maybe 8 x 10 thing, in Chicago 40 years ago, and having my breath taken away. The canvas background oranges made the picture look on fire. You don't get that in the prints. Thanks goodness for museums where I can see his originals!

Joy said...

This painting is so beautiful on the screen. I can only imagine to view the original. How fortunate for you to see it now everyday in your home.
I understand Tammy Vitale's comment. We went to The Dallas Museum of Fine Arts a couple of weekends ago, and I completely agree with her point. There's nothing like the real thing baby.

Joy

KatyB said...

Nice pic.

Chairman Bill said...

I'm still not convinced about the desire to own an original not being something to do with snobbery. You can get copies that are exact replicas of the original, down to the brush strokes, bumps and cracks - yet people still eschew them in favour of originals.

Who, for example, would hang a copy of the Mona Lisa in their house? Everyone agrees it's a masterpiece, yet no-one would deign to have a copy on display. They'd rather have an indifferent original from an unknown artist over a copy of a masterpiece.

It has to be snobbery. I can't explain it otherwise.

ladyfi said...

I love the vibrant colours! Delicious!

Louise said...

@Chairman Bill : The Mona Lisa's become a bit of a cliché - I couldnt imagine ever wanting a copy hanging on my wall. Same with many of the other masterworks - Leonardo, Michaelangelo, Van Gogh, the Impressionists...And I can't explain why I feel this way. Perhaps I've been conditioned to believe that the masterpieces of a bygone age have their place elsewhere - in museums, in books, in churches - and the art that is created today is more suitable for my immediate context...

Chairman Bill said...

But why? You can't deny the old masters were great works of art.

Search your soul for the answer.

Joy said...

I just don't think my black velvet painting of Elvis would be the same in a print.


Joy

GutsyWriter said...

I love Tammy's vibrant colors and thank you for sharing. I couldn't see her gallery when I clicked on it. Will try later.