Copyright © Louise Bostock 2007-2013. Please give credit where credit is due.

Wednesday, 19 November 2008

November colour

Five degrees at 9am. With brilliant sunshine and a clear blue sky to gladden the heart.




Recommended for November colour : pineapple sage (Salvia elegans), the leaves of which really do smell deliciously of pineapple. I planted this one in the summer, and only now discover that it may not see out the coldest part of the winter (being a native of the very much warmer Mexico). In the meantime, I'm enjoying the brilliance of its flowers, and my fingers are crossed.

Copyright © Louise Bostock 2007, 2008. All rights reserved. Please ask first.

7 comments:

Cairo Typ0 said...

You could try transplanting it and bringing inside. I know several peple who do this with their herb gardens with varying degrees of success.

LadyFi said...

Lovely to have a bit of Mexican colour to brighten up a cold November!
Perhaps if you cover it with sackcloth or material or something to keep it warm - might it not survive then? Roses survive covered up here in Stockholm, where the temps can dip down to minus 20 or below.

Louise, Carmine Superiore said...

Thanks - these are both good ideas. I'll ask at the nursery that sold me the plant and see which solution they recommend - perhaps some of that white fluffy stuff...?

Louise, Carmine Superiore said...

Minus 20? I just read minus 20. That's bobble-hats-in-bed weather!

LadyFi said...

Yep - definitely bobble hats full skisuit in bed kind of weather. Luckily, the Swedes have insulation and good heating, so regular pjs or your birthday suit are OK.

So, if roses can survive, I'm sure your plant can. Just remembered that you are supposed to put bark strips around the roots and then cover them up for the winter. Our neighbours' roses have flowered gloriously for the past 8 yrs, in spite of cold weather... (Not always down to minus 20 C, thank goodness!!)

Vanessa said...

That plant's got a view to die for dammit!

Braja said...

Ahh, but it has it's moment of glory in Carmine Superior, no?

Wednesday, 19 November 2008

November colour

Five degrees at 9am. With brilliant sunshine and a clear blue sky to gladden the heart.




Recommended for November colour : pineapple sage (Salvia elegans), the leaves of which really do smell deliciously of pineapple. I planted this one in the summer, and only now discover that it may not see out the coldest part of the winter (being a native of the very much warmer Mexico). In the meantime, I'm enjoying the brilliance of its flowers, and my fingers are crossed.

Copyright © Louise Bostock 2007, 2008. All rights reserved. Please ask first.

7 comments:

Cairo Typ0 said...

You could try transplanting it and bringing inside. I know several peple who do this with their herb gardens with varying degrees of success.

LadyFi said...

Lovely to have a bit of Mexican colour to brighten up a cold November!
Perhaps if you cover it with sackcloth or material or something to keep it warm - might it not survive then? Roses survive covered up here in Stockholm, where the temps can dip down to minus 20 or below.

Louise, Carmine Superiore said...

Thanks - these are both good ideas. I'll ask at the nursery that sold me the plant and see which solution they recommend - perhaps some of that white fluffy stuff...?

Louise, Carmine Superiore said...

Minus 20? I just read minus 20. That's bobble-hats-in-bed weather!

LadyFi said...

Yep - definitely bobble hats full skisuit in bed kind of weather. Luckily, the Swedes have insulation and good heating, so regular pjs or your birthday suit are OK.

So, if roses can survive, I'm sure your plant can. Just remembered that you are supposed to put bark strips around the roots and then cover them up for the winter. Our neighbours' roses have flowered gloriously for the past 8 yrs, in spite of cold weather... (Not always down to minus 20 C, thank goodness!!)

Vanessa said...

That plant's got a view to die for dammit!

Braja said...

Ahh, but it has it's moment of glory in Carmine Superior, no?