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Tuesday, 14 October 2008

Motherhoods means...No. 8

Motherhood (in Carmine) means...going to bed with the prayer that someone will leave a fully-trained, child-friendly, cat-loving, hyper-intelligent English shepherd at my door.

Getting these children up and down the hill four times a day is like herding cats.


PS Fourteen degrees again at 9am. But there's a mackerel sky, so perhaps shortly I'll be exercising a greater part of my weather-description powers than of late (now how many words are there in the English language for 'rain'?).

5 comments:

Vanessa said...

Herding cats! V. funny!

Anonymous said...

Have you ever thought what you would do if one of your kids is sick and you need to take the other one down to school????

Anonymous said...

If one of the kids gets sick just keep them both off school.

Louise said...

Hi anonymous and anonymous, It sure is an issue, you're right. Let's hope they both get sick together! Or that the non-sick child is prepared to do some English-language swatting in home-school.

Jacqueline Smith said...

Words for rain: drizzle, shower, pour, squall... can't think of any more. That's not nearly as many as what the Eskimos have for snow.

It's nice and dry over here in Jamaica, I don't even know what temperature, in fact I have no notion of temperature whatsoever. We are getting some cold wind from North America, we call it Christmus breeze, a term which features in many of our songs and poems.

Tuesday, 14 October 2008

Motherhoods means...No. 8

Motherhood (in Carmine) means...going to bed with the prayer that someone will leave a fully-trained, child-friendly, cat-loving, hyper-intelligent English shepherd at my door.

Getting these children up and down the hill four times a day is like herding cats.


PS Fourteen degrees again at 9am. But there's a mackerel sky, so perhaps shortly I'll be exercising a greater part of my weather-description powers than of late (now how many words are there in the English language for 'rain'?).

5 comments:

Vanessa said...

Herding cats! V. funny!

Anonymous said...

Have you ever thought what you would do if one of your kids is sick and you need to take the other one down to school????

Anonymous said...

If one of the kids gets sick just keep them both off school.

Louise said...

Hi anonymous and anonymous, It sure is an issue, you're right. Let's hope they both get sick together! Or that the non-sick child is prepared to do some English-language swatting in home-school.

Jacqueline Smith said...

Words for rain: drizzle, shower, pour, squall... can't think of any more. That's not nearly as many as what the Eskimos have for snow.

It's nice and dry over here in Jamaica, I don't even know what temperature, in fact I have no notion of temperature whatsoever. We are getting some cold wind from North America, we call it Christmus breeze, a term which features in many of our songs and poems.