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Wednesday, 27 August 2008

A quick Italian lesson

Looks like today will be a carbon copy of yesterday. Weather-wise, that is.


My Italian vocabulary took another Great Leap Forward yesterday, with the addition of these lovely words :

prurito : itching
lacrimazione : teary
arossamento : redness
starnuti : sneezing
naso chiuso : blocked nose
naso che cola : runny nose
tosse : cough
affano : breathlessness
fischio : wheezing
acari : dust mite

You guessed it. In Carmine today, we're officially allergy central.

And here's a bit of medieval Latin that was already in my vocabulary and quite aptly expresses my feelings :

Oh bugger!

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hello Louise,
Don't let the allergies get you down. We all suffer from one thing or another. Many children grow out of it as they are exposed to more and more allergens and their organs expand. (Lungs in particular). Children survive and with modern medicine these ailments are controlled to the extent that they become insignificant and an inhaler becomes a badge of honour. Don't worry and don't let it get you down. Wait until they are teenagers then the worry will start.

Ilse said...

Louise, dear, I spent ALL my school and university years writing end exams during the worst of the Southern Hemisphere's hayfever season and survived to tell the tale. However, it would have been slightly better if my mom had been more sympathetic!

Jacqueline Smith said...

I suffered from allergies as a child and still do in the spring time. My nasal passage tends to get swollen and blocks off breathing. As a child, before my mother found out that it was the actual lining that swelled, the doctors thought it was a polyp that needed to be removed. Can you imagine? What if they had gone in and removed the lining? At one stage I worried that I'd never find a partner who'd be willing to put up with me and my misery at these times. Thank goodness for D. Right now, someone is thanking goodness for you.

Ingrid said...

Hey! :) I was reading your blog and the ''about you'' section, and I must say wow! :) That's so amazing that you changed your life in that way!

I bet it's really beautiful where you live and well the culture is soo much different :)

.. oh and about this post.. well yeah I must agree with the anonymous person above, don't let the allergies get you down :) We all have them and it all can be treated..

Take care

Ingrid

Louise said...

Hi Ilse - my brother, too, as I remember, was always weeping with hay fever through his summer exams. I recall they gave him hundreds of injections at the start of the year to forestall the hay fever - I think I would have preferred the latter. Still, there is hope - he doesn't get it any more, at least to the extent he used to!

Louise said...

Hi Ingrid - thanks for your visit. Yes, it's beautiful here, and living here has taught me many new things about life. E.g. a place is only as beautiful as the people living in it...

Louise said...

Hi Jacqueline, thanks for visiting and for commenting. You must have had a pretty rough time! How awful! I never suffered at all from allergies as a child. When I got older I realised that a particular stuffed-up feeling in my nose was to do with drinking too much New World red wine. And when I was pregnant with AJ, I had a one-time-only allergy to mimosa pollen (I think). But I'm trying my best to empathise with the poor little wretch.

Louise said...

Hi Jacqueline, thanks for visiting and for commenting. You must have had a pretty rough time! How awful! I never suffered at all from allergies as a child. When I got older I realised that a particular stuffed-up feeling in my nose was to do with drinking too much New World red wine. And when I was pregnant with AJ, I had a one-time-only allergy to mimosa pollen (I think). But I'm trying my best to empathise with the poor little wretch.

Liara Covert said...

I was recently in Croatia and Slovenia and was amazed at all the Italian tourists and communities there. Whenever I listen and observe people pronounce Italian vocabulary, I feel the energy and rhythm. It seems to vibrate at a higher frequency than some other languages. Thoughts are raised to a higher frequency whenever your thougths are focused on love. No wonder certain languages are often associated with lovers?

Wednesday, 27 August 2008

A quick Italian lesson

Looks like today will be a carbon copy of yesterday. Weather-wise, that is.


My Italian vocabulary took another Great Leap Forward yesterday, with the addition of these lovely words :

prurito : itching
lacrimazione : teary
arossamento : redness
starnuti : sneezing
naso chiuso : blocked nose
naso che cola : runny nose
tosse : cough
affano : breathlessness
fischio : wheezing
acari : dust mite

You guessed it. In Carmine today, we're officially allergy central.

And here's a bit of medieval Latin that was already in my vocabulary and quite aptly expresses my feelings :

Oh bugger!

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hello Louise,
Don't let the allergies get you down. We all suffer from one thing or another. Many children grow out of it as they are exposed to more and more allergens and their organs expand. (Lungs in particular). Children survive and with modern medicine these ailments are controlled to the extent that they become insignificant and an inhaler becomes a badge of honour. Don't worry and don't let it get you down. Wait until they are teenagers then the worry will start.

Ilse said...

Louise, dear, I spent ALL my school and university years writing end exams during the worst of the Southern Hemisphere's hayfever season and survived to tell the tale. However, it would have been slightly better if my mom had been more sympathetic!

Jacqueline Smith said...

I suffered from allergies as a child and still do in the spring time. My nasal passage tends to get swollen and blocks off breathing. As a child, before my mother found out that it was the actual lining that swelled, the doctors thought it was a polyp that needed to be removed. Can you imagine? What if they had gone in and removed the lining? At one stage I worried that I'd never find a partner who'd be willing to put up with me and my misery at these times. Thank goodness for D. Right now, someone is thanking goodness for you.

Ingrid said...

Hey! :) I was reading your blog and the ''about you'' section, and I must say wow! :) That's so amazing that you changed your life in that way!

I bet it's really beautiful where you live and well the culture is soo much different :)

.. oh and about this post.. well yeah I must agree with the anonymous person above, don't let the allergies get you down :) We all have them and it all can be treated..

Take care

Ingrid

Louise said...

Hi Ilse - my brother, too, as I remember, was always weeping with hay fever through his summer exams. I recall they gave him hundreds of injections at the start of the year to forestall the hay fever - I think I would have preferred the latter. Still, there is hope - he doesn't get it any more, at least to the extent he used to!

Louise said...

Hi Ingrid - thanks for your visit. Yes, it's beautiful here, and living here has taught me many new things about life. E.g. a place is only as beautiful as the people living in it...

Louise said...

Hi Jacqueline, thanks for visiting and for commenting. You must have had a pretty rough time! How awful! I never suffered at all from allergies as a child. When I got older I realised that a particular stuffed-up feeling in my nose was to do with drinking too much New World red wine. And when I was pregnant with AJ, I had a one-time-only allergy to mimosa pollen (I think). But I'm trying my best to empathise with the poor little wretch.

Louise said...

Hi Jacqueline, thanks for visiting and for commenting. You must have had a pretty rough time! How awful! I never suffered at all from allergies as a child. When I got older I realised that a particular stuffed-up feeling in my nose was to do with drinking too much New World red wine. And when I was pregnant with AJ, I had a one-time-only allergy to mimosa pollen (I think). But I'm trying my best to empathise with the poor little wretch.

Liara Covert said...

I was recently in Croatia and Slovenia and was amazed at all the Italian tourists and communities there. Whenever I listen and observe people pronounce Italian vocabulary, I feel the energy and rhythm. It seems to vibrate at a higher frequency than some other languages. Thoughts are raised to a higher frequency whenever your thougths are focused on love. No wonder certain languages are often associated with lovers?